Book presentation ‘Treasures in Trusted Hands. Negotiating the Future of Colonial Cultural Objects’ by Jos van Beurden

05/29/2017

University of Amsterdam, Bijzondere Collecties, Oude Turfmarkt 129, 1012 GC Amsterdam

Book presentation ‘Treasures in Trusted Hands. Negotiating the Future of Colonial Cultural Objects’ by Jos van Beurden

CLUE+ Research Institute for Culture, History and Heritage

Humanities

Other

During this book presentation, Marieke van Bommel (Museum aan de Stroom, Antwerpen), Laura van Broekhoven (Pitt Rivers Museum, Oxford), Taco Dibbets (Rijksmuseum), Steven Engelsman (Wereldmuseum, Wien), Stijn Schoonderwoerd  (Nederlandse Musea van Wereldculturen), Nanette Snoep (Ethnological Museums, Saxony) and Pauljac Verhoeven (Museum Bronbeek) will give a talk.
Treasures in Trusted Hands. Negotiating the Future of Colonial Cultural Objects is a pioneering study which charts the one-way traffic of cultural and historical objects during five centuries of European colonialism and presents principles and a model to set up a new dialogue about this neglected aspect of decolonisation.

The book presents abundant examples of disappeared colonial objects and systematizes these into war booty, confiscations by missionaries and contestable acquisitions by private persons and other categories. Former colonies consider this loss as a historical injustice that has not been undone. Former colonial powers have kept most of the objects in their custody. Although the Netherlands and Belgium returned objects to their former colonies Indonesia and DR Congo in the 1970s, their number was considerably smaller than what had been asked for. While Nigeria’s requests for the return of some Benin objects, confiscated by British soldiers in 1897, have been rejected so far, the Netherlands have offered the collection of the Nusantara Museum in Delft to Indonesia.

The book presents Principles for Dealing with Colonial Cultural and Historical Objects. They are based on the 1998 Washington Conference Principles for Dealing with Nazi-Confiscated Art and are part of a model to facilitate mediation in disputes about them. The book concludes that Europe, the former colonisers, should do more pro-active provenance research into the acquisitions from the colonial era, both in public institutions and private collections.

Time: 15.00 – 17.30
Location: Bijzondere Collecties, Oude Turfmarkt 129, 1012 GC Amsterdam
Registration (obligatory):http://bijzonderecollecties.uva.nl/bezoek-contact/aanmelden-treasures-in-trusted-hands
Access: Free
Language: Dutch
Link publisher: https://www.sidestone.com/books/treasures-in-trusted-hands